User Profile

Sarah

sarah@bookishbook.club

Joined 1 year, 6 months ago

It's me, wynkenhimself! Most of my booklist is still over at @wynkenhimself@bookwyrm.social and maybe I'll import it someday, but I'm trying to primarily post over here now. I pretty much only list the fun reads I do here, and the Bookish Book Club ones, but maybe I'll do a better job of tracking my work reading too. Remember: if you don't like a book, you can stop reading it!!

This link opens in a pop-up window

Sarah's books

Stopped Reading

Currently Reading

To Read (View all 7)

Peng Shepherd: The Cartographers (Paperback, 2021, HarperLuxe) 3 stars

Nell Young's whole life and greatest passion is cartography. Her father, Dr. Daniel Young, is …

Last night’s weirdness: apparently these PhD students convinced their department chair to accept their group project and provide funding and then they graduated before they had actually begun the project??!! I am trying to focus on the big-picture weirdnesses, not the typical misunderstanding of boring academic and library procedures, but what?&?&?!!! What are we supposed to imagine they got their PhDs for if not actual research?! (I am complaining but also I am having fun and I am into the romance anxieties actually)

Peng Shepherd: The Cartographers (Paperback, 2021, HarperLuxe) 3 stars

Nell Young's whole life and greatest passion is cartography. Her father, Dr. Daniel Young, is …

last night’s jaw drop among other things: a private company was hired to scan everything in the map library with a snap of a finger (lollll) and they plan to attach “micro RFIDs” to EVERY SINGLE ITEM in the map collection!!!!! Can’t wait to see what tonight’s jaw drop will be 😱

Peng Shepherd: The Cartographers (Paperback, 2021, HarperLuxe) 3 stars

Nell Young's whole life and greatest passion is cartography. Her father, Dr. Daniel Young, is …

I am so aghast at this I have to keep reading just to see what else transpires, but (a) the author seems to think that a cartographer is someone who studies maps and (b) your work as a studier of maps means that you are a scholar, curator, and conservator like not a paper conservator, you’re a map conservator, and that (c) getting a job in the NYPL Map library is something your dad, who currently holds the job, can just give you and then (d) on top of all that, the main character, who is a purported cartographer with her own conservation tools in her lab, this person puts on DISH GLOVES to open up what she think is a priceless map. Dish gloves, I tell you. Like a gazillion times worse than cotton gloves which are already bad!!!

*please if I have fundamentally misunderstood the field of cartography …

Leslie Howsam: Old Books and New Histories (Hardcover, 2006, University of Toronto Press) 5 stars

A+ disciplinary situatedness

5 stars

Rereading this as teaching prep and rediscovering how much I love this book. It was just about the first thing I read as a budding book historian to help me think about what the field might be. And returning to those questions today from a position of much greater familiarity with book history, I’m struck by how nuanced and yet available to newcomers Howsam is (and now that I know Leslie, it’s no surprise—she and her work are like that!). Anyways, if you’re looking to get a sense of why and what book history might be, this will be tremendously helpful.

Maria Dahvana Headley, JD Jackson: Beowulf (AudiobookFormat, 2020, Macmillan Audio) 5 stars

A new, feminist translation of Beowulf by the author of the much-buzzed-about novel The Mere …

perfect audiobook for this translation

5 stars

This was a delightful translation to listen to--Headley's sense of rhythm and storytelling turns into bro-slinging narrative of blood and kinship and loss (and hoo boy does Headley do a good job with keeping at the front all the misogyny that crops up in the poem). I might try reading Headley's translation at some point. For now, I'm really glad I listened to it.